Archive | TTIP

RSS
  • Second life for TTIP looking likelier

    Though the EU-US TTIP agreement is widely thought to be “in the freezer”, evidence given to confirmation hearings by Robert Lighthizer, Donald Trump’s nominee for US Trade Representative, seems to indicate the US Administration is still open-minded about its future.

  • US “hasn’t yet decided on TTIP”

    In a March 10 background briefing with reporters, US officials surprisingly revealed the Trump administration has “not formulated a final position” on whether or not it will continue to pursue a proposed Transatlantic Trade & Investment Partnership (TTIP) agreement with the EU.

  • First details emerge of probable NAFTA and Border Tax legislation – but where’s China?

    US Congressional Republican leaders made their pitch on February 1 and 2 for handling NAFTA renegotiation and border taxes. Trump’s earlier China commitments seem to have disappeared.

  • EU admits TTIP “firmly in freezer”

    The EU’s Trade Commissioner Cecilia Malmström said in a January 24 speech that the “The election of Donald Trump seems likely to put our EU-US [TTIP] negotiations firmly in the freezer at least for a while”.

  • Trump’s global trade policy: act like a New York garmento

    The developed world depends almost entirely on imports from poorer countries for its clothing. The world’s biggest apparel importer looks certain to transform its attitude to importing that apparel

  • Trump’s victory certainly doesn’t increase trading uncertainty.

    Practically every observer thought Hillary Clinton would win the US Presidential election this morning. Most went on to predict her mild hostility to further trade liberalisation meant the short-term prospects for global trade would be looking uncertain by now.
    Donald Trump, though, has been consistent and unambiguous about his trade policy.

  • Would a President Trump really stomach a TPP?

    Those who believe Donald Trump will become as pro-trade as previous US presidents if he won the November election seriously misunderstand him.

  • How secrecy’s killing the trade deals

    Why is the TPP (and with it the TTIP and the TiSA) so close to death?

  • European parliament in disarray over TTIP

    On June 8, leaders of the G7 – including the heads of government in the US, UK, Germany, France and Italy – announced a “goal of … the outline of an agreement… by the end of this year” on the proposed Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP.) On June 9, the European Parliament suspended a debate on TTIP because it was impossible to find a form of words legislators could agree on.

  • European parliament doesn’t block TTIP

    The European Parliament’s trade committee voted for a compromise TTIP proposal on May 28, leaving open some variation of the controversial Investor/state dispute settlement process previously been though to be opposed by a majority of MEPs.

  • Europeans review their trade arrangements

    EU announces review of extending its Customs Union with Turkey – but won’t let Turkey into negotiations on TTIP (which Turkey wants to join). It says it will upgrade its free trade deal with Mexico to match its deal with Canada and TTIP – but Americans and some European politicians stay sniffy about its Trade Commissioners’s views on TTIP.

  • Why’s no-one promoting all these proposed trade deals properly?

    What’s the case for the trade deals – the multinational ones like TPP, TTIP, TiSA and the two-way ones like the EU-Vietnam FTA –  there’s so much fuss about getting agreed?  In a May 19 Sourcing Journal article I looked at what supporters are arguing. And found  little to reassure me.

  • EU-US trade treaty looks likely to take longer than expected

    At a March 25 meeting between European national trade ministers and the EU’s Trade Commissioner:

  • TTIP: Europeans and Americans try to defuse mass European hostility

    The senior EU and US trade officials issued a statement on March 20 attempting to reassure widespread European fears that alleged US insistence on the “Investor to State Dispute Settlement” (ISDS) process in the proposed US-EU Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) is a cover for legally enforced privatisation of public services.

  • EU-US trade discussions proceed at lesiure

    EU-US  negotiations continued on a free trade TTIP between February 2 and 6, with no surprising delays or advances.